DJing weddings is not as easy as it sounds. Getting the first dance right, father/daughter dances… In fact, Christmas parties are the easiest, as the punters are already drunk before you even plug in your first light. So you don’t really have to do much. In my opinion, weddings are the toughest there is. I’m gonna give you a few pointers as to what to do, why to do it, and the best way to support your DJ to get the best night out of it. Obviously, read my blog on Wedding Disco: What ruins a potentially great Disco! for other reason’s why a wedding disco could be bad.

Why is it a good idea that you, the Bride & Groom, provide the playlist for your wedding?

And, why not!

It is your wedding!

Of course, the first point it is your day, you get what you want. Don’t let cousin Jeff have his tunes from his band ruin a great vibe when their music would probably be beaten in the charts by pneumatic drill. However, providing a list of songs for the DJ to work through throughout the night is fantastic. It gives us an idea of what you like. For example, if you give us three of four songs from 2000’s that feature RnB artists, then we can work out what songs we can add to your list that will enhance your night. Having a list, and told to only play off the list, is like asking a 100 meter runner to wear steel toe boots for his final race. He could run it fine, but he isn’t gonna win any medals.

We will play only off your list, but ensure the guests know the music has been chosen by you. So pick really good songs!!

It helps you trust the DJ will play songs you like.

As I mentioned, having a list allows the DJ to ‘float around’ genres, eras, and artists that fit into your list while you have the faith the list will be played. I mean, most of the night you are gonna be so busy enjoying yourself you probably won’t here that SpiceGirls song you love, doesn’t mean the DJ didn’t play it. Plus, there are some DJ’s that think they are hired for being them, and play what they want…and are usually better placed on the side of a road, in the desert.

Some DJ’s are absolutely terrible!

Oh, my, word…I was a guest to a wedding once, and I felt like kicking the guy off the stage and taking over. He was terrible, talked on the mic after every song..not coherently I’ll add. Muffled noise, followed by the same song he played ten minutes ago. He sat on a chair looking like he would rather be thumbing through a newspaper with a pipe in his gob. Had a woman sat next to him who looked like she was judging the whole room. Really showed me I have a great presence and character when performing. Because, it is a performance. So please, provide a playlist if you have never done either of these three things;

  1. Met the DJ
  2. Read a review
  3. Been to one of their disco’s

Sometimes a friend or relative will recommend a DJ, but then you provide a playlist. Remember that bit…provide a playlist. I was once recommended, and the person who recommended me is still up in my top 10 discos I have ever done. I digress, the person who recommended me told me three artists they like, and said “ooo, I love a bit of 80s and Motown”. This was plenty for me to go and rock their party. However, when I was booked via recommendation, and given a “only play off this” list, you can imagine the night had top ten value moments, but other times felt more like a empty room had more life due to how restricted I was. During the night, when the organiser asked why their friend’s party was better, I didn’t lie, I told them. No playlist meant I could DJ. The reply was: Scrap the playlist, lets party…so we did.

Recommended tips:

  • If you can, always meet the DJ. Either face to face, through a wedding showcase, or simply through social media. Trust me, their Instagram or FaceBook posts should tell you how their parties go.
  • Always try your best to give a list of songs, but remember to allow the DJ to chose if certain songs are not to be played and allow them to add songs, or play ‘around’ your list. This means to put songs in that work with your list, and will keep the party going. This is the bit you are paying them to do. Otherwise, you could hire a sound system and play a personal playlist. Of course, if there is a song or two you really want, highlight them, they most probably will be ace.
  • Don’t request: Mr Bright-side, Uptown Funk, I Wanna Dance With Somebody, or Don’t Stop Me Now. They are already in 99% of DJ’s arsenal as strong songs. Requesting them too soon or too late, means the dynamic of the evening changes. For a nice flow to the evening, if you request any of these, they will be played, but timing is everything. Playing Mr Bright-side early, means the energy of the evening will either burn out too soon and everyone will be knackered from dancing like loons from the start, or no one will dance because they’re not ready. Most like to be tipsy, and have eaten a plateful of buffet before getting up.

Final thought.

If you want to ask your guests to request songs on your invites, that is fine. Remember that you are giving control of your evening party to them. If they chose songs that are boring, or inappropriate but you have said they need to be played, we will play them. Sometimes, it is best to be worked between Bride and Groom, and the DJ.

Disclaimer: I am a professional events and mobile DJ of five years, mostly weddings, in a variety of hotels and small venues. I pride myself in providing the best service and experience I can for the Bride, Groom, and their guests.