I have successfully streamed and recorded a trial run using my set up. It’s decent enough for a DJ, small production company, and even video casting.

The problems I have encountered, and how I will overcome them!

Back in year 1 of CMT I was introduced to hacking. May sound like I’m going to get your online details and steal your identity, but no. This particular type of hacking is in the form of technology based, physical equipment. I was introduced to Arduino… And Teensy.

Problem 1: The speed of the laptop I used for the test is actually terrible. It takes about fifteen minutes to load a basic program, like documents. I think the timer is about seven minutes when you right click, and that is a long time to wait for a simple menu. So, imagine what happened when I plugged in four rather powerful webcams. Fantastic guess there guys, yep, you are right. None worked. To overcome this, and if you have similar issues, I recommend you try this first, I had to lower the resolution down to almost watch face size. The results though, the lower the resolution, the more of the cameras worked. When I had the resolution at 1364 x 768, only one camera worked. Two worked at 908 x 512, and when I got to 496 x 278 I had all four cameras working. However, as you can imagine, 496 x 278 picture quality is that of opening your eyes under water. We’ve all done it, and it’s fuzzy. Yeah, you could see the pictures, but it was not the quality I was after.

Problem solved! So to speak.

Problem 2: Changing scenes without using the laptop. Open Broadcast Software (OBS) is free to use and as of yet, I have not found a suitable controller for scene switching…or have I?

I have set up my scenes and used the in software ‘HotKeys’ to set up numbers 1 through 4, 9, and 0, to represent scenes. 9 is the stream take-over, which is a scene that is basically the thumbnail that shows to allow viewer to see the stream will begin soon. 0 is the end credits or after scene. And 1 through 4 are various camera angles sent up. For example, one camera has been cropped on two scenes, as it’s a wide shot if covers two people on a sofa. By cropping the shot on two separate scenes, I can use one camera for two angles. Win!

But, I’m stuck with the laptop camera being available but, it just watches the person directing. Insert Teensy here!!!

I’m gonna build one. I’m going to use a teensy I bought for a past project, program it to allow buttons to send a keyboard signal, probably numbers. This way, the scene changes can be controlled by the host of a live broadcast, much like most video tubers have. Obviously mine will be a lot lower budget, and made out of what ever I have available to had. The first trial run of this will be on May 5th, for the marathon, mentioned in another blog.

Problem 3: I’m having a little trouble with audio. Getting sound into OBS is easy, also I have microphones and a USB mixing desk so that is all good to. However, having the mics in frame, is not the professional look I’m aiming for. I want them either off camera, or completely hidden/blended in with the scene. I’m probably going to go with lapel microphones, with extension cables to the mixing desk. Each extension will be in place before the guests, actors, tubers, are in place, with all levels tested. This is not the best way to get the best sound out of the situation, but as mention many times, I’m aiming to be affordable to people like me, who just want to do what the professionals do, but to an average Joe budget.

The Controller

The design is simple. A teensy, six buttons, a few cables, and a hand holdable case…to which I have an old harmonica that is broken, but has a useful case.

The Plan: Once the coding of the teensy is done and tested to ensure it controls 0, 9, and 1 through 4 on a standard qwerty keyboard, I will drill a few holes in the box to fit the teensy, buttons, and USB cable. Then, I’ll temporarily attach everything and test it. Once happy, I’ll glue and re-glue all the bits inside the box, and then before completion, I’ll cover the box in sticky back decorative plastic or stickers, and glue it shut. I’m still deciding if I’m going to ‘pad out’ the inside to give it some dexterity while being held. This will be decided during test phase.

UPDATE 1: I failed with this, I wired the buttons wrong. So, I found a Twitch Switch tutorial on YouTube, and I’m going to follow that.

UPDATE 2:

I bloody did it. Well, huge thanks to www.nuts&bots.com for the tutorials, design, and code.

Here is the fully working, progression photo blah blah for ya. Enjoy. Also, if you want one, email me, and I’ll build you one to.

Yep. I branded it too. 😂